Children's Festival of Welsh History 2016

Locations 2016

Compass

Carmarthen Castle

Carmarthen Castle

Carmarthen Castle is one of Wales most important castles. It was built around 1106 by Henry 1st of England. It was built near the site of Carmarthen's Roman Fort, taking advantage of a defensive position overlooking and controlling the river Towi and river access to the Welsh Princes lands of Deheubarth.

The castle was originally a Motte and Bailey but was rebuilt in stone with the shell keep built around 1230. The castle's walls encompassed parts of Carmarthen allowing a thriving medieval town to develop.

The castle has an interesting and violent history with many battles fought nearby over control of the castle, with one of the most famous incidents in the early 1400s when the castle was repeatedly taken by Owain Glyndwr during his rebellion, but recaptured by Henry VI himself.

The castle played a role in the later Civil War between 1642-45 when it was captured and recaptured before its eventual slighting in 1660, when the castle saw its remaining walls used as part of the County Gaol in the late 1600s, 1700s and 1800s.

Castle Coch

Castle Coch

'Y Glêr' was the name given to the busking bards of the Middla Ages. These poets referred to as y glêr tended to be sub standard and would have to travel from one noble house to the next to try and earn their keep, which was considered to be inferior, by some of the more established poets.

Anni Llŷn, this years’ Welsh language children’s poet laureate will tour some of Wales’ finest castles, staging poetry and storytelling sessions to local schools in medieval style.

Cardigan Castle

Cardigan Castle

Cardigan Castle occupies a naturally strategic position which overlooks the lowest crossing point of the River Teifi affording spectacular views both seaward and inland. Lord Rhys is believed to have started rebuilding the castle in stone in 1171, the first Welsh man to build a stone Castle. In 1176, to mark the completion of the Castle, Lord Rhys held the first ever Eisteddfod, a celebration which included competitions between poets and harpists.

A few centuries after the first Eisteddfod was held at the castle, Henry Tudor, in his attempt to recruit an army to fight against Richard lll at Bosworth, called at Cardigan Castle to gather support.

Today, following a major restoration project, Cardigan Castle is open to the public for all to enjoy. It’s home to an exhibition on the history of the Eisteddfod, as well as a year long programme of varied events.

Coity Castle

Coity Castle

'Y Glêr' was the name given to the busking bards of the Middla Ages. These poets referred to as y glêr tended to be sub standard and would have to travel from one noble house to the next to try and earn their keep, which was considered to be inferior, by some of the more established poets.

Anni Llŷn, this years’ Welsh language children’s poet laureate will tour some of Wales’ finest castles, staging poetry and storytelling sessions to local schools in medieval style.

Flint Castle

Flint Castle

'Y Glêr' was the name given to the busking bards of the Middla Ages. These poets referred to as y glêr tended to be sub standard and would have to travel from one noble house to the next to try and earn their keep, which was considered to be inferior, by some of the more established poets.

Anni Llŷn, this years’ Welsh language children’s poet laureate will tour some of Wales’ finest castles, staging poetry and storytelling sessions to local schools in medieval style.

Denbigh Castle

Denbigh Castle

'Y Glêr' was the name given to the busking bards of the Middla Ages. These poets referred to as y glêr tended to be sub standard and would have to travel from one noble house to the next to try and earn their keep, which was considered to be inferior, by some of the more established poets.

Anni Llŷn, this years’ Welsh language children’s poet laureate will tour some of Wales’ finest castles, staging poetry and storytelling sessions to local schools in medieval style.

Criccieth Castle

Criccieth Castle

'Y Glêr' was the name given to the busking bards of the Middla Ages. These poets referred to as y glêr tended to be sub standard and would have to travel from one noble house to the next to try and earn their keep, which was considered to be inferior, by some of the more established poets.

Anni Llŷn, this years’ Welsh language children’s poet laureate will tour some of Wales’ finest castles, staging poetry and storytelling sessions to local schools in medieval style.

Caernarfon Castle

Caernarfon Castle

'Y Glêr' was the name given to the busking bards of the Middla Ages. These poets referred to as y glêr tended to be sub standard and would have to travel from one noble house to the next to try and earn their keep, which was considered to be inferior, by some of the more established poets.

Anni Llŷn, this years’ Welsh language children’s poet laureate will tour some of Wales’ finest castles, staging poetry and storytelling sessions to local schools in medieval style.

Caerphilly Castle

caerphilly Castle

'Y Glêr' was the name given to the busking bards of the Middla Ages. These poets referred to as y glêr tended to be sub standard and would have to travel from one noble house to the next to try and earn their keep, which was considered to be inferior, by some of the more established poets.

Anni Llŷn, this years’ Welsh language children’s poet laureate will tour some of Wales’ finest castles, staging poetry and storytelling sessions to local schools in medieval style.

Llansteffan Castle

Llansteffan Castle

Llansteffan castle stands on a headland overlooking the sand-flats of the mouth of the river Tywi. The castle controlled an important river crossing and it changed hands several times during fierce fighting between the Normans and the Welsh.

Shiloh Chapel

shiloh

'Y Glêr' was the name given to the busking bards of the Middla Ages. These poets referred to as y glêr tended to be sub standard and would have to travel from one noble house to the next to try and earn their keep, which was considered to be inferior, by some of the more established poets.

Anni Llŷn, this years’ Welsh language children’s poet laureate will tour some of Wales’ finest castles, staging poetry and storytelling sessions to local schools in medieval style.

Margam Castle

Margam Castle

Steeped in history, wildlife and natural beauty, there’s something for everyone at Margam Country Park. The magnificent Margam Castle, Orangery with ornamental gardens and Deer Park, are set within 1000 acres of breathtaking countryside. Park attractions include a narrow gauge railway, adventure playgrounds, Fairytale Land (children’s area with a nursery rhyme theme) and rare breeds farm trail.

This 19th Century Tudor Gothic Mansion was designed by the architect Thomas Hopper for Christopher Rice Mansel Talbot.

The house was built in 1830 – 40 at a cost of £50,000 using local sandstone. Listed Grade I as a mansion of exceptional quality, the Castle has some spectacular features such as the vast stairwell and octagonal tower. One frequent visitor to Margam was Talbot’s cousin, Henry Fox Talbot of Lacock. A pioneer photographer, he succeeded in taking one of the earliest photographic views which clearly shows the corner of the south west façade.

The castle was used by both British and US troops in WWII, and American General Dwight Eisenhower visited during preparations for the D-Day landings.

Capel y Priordy

Capel y Priordy

A happy, friendly and welcoming chapel in Carmarthen town.

Raglan Castle

Raglan Castle

In 1462, King Edward IV placed 5 year old Henry Tudor in the custody of Yorkist William Herbert, who owned Raglan Castle, and his wife, to be brought up at Raglan. Henry’s mother was only 13, and his father had died of plague before he was born. Henry Tudor stayed at Raglan castle for nearly 10 years.

Whilst at Raglan, Henry was tutored by two clerics, Edward Haseley and Andrew Scot, and perhaps trained in gentlemanly pursuits by Sir Hugh Johnys. He learned some archery, and may have learnt some Welsh while he was there, as the Herbert family and servants all spoke Welsh.

William Herbert had hoped to marry Henry Tudor to his eldest daughter, Maud, but he died before that could be arranged. Henry Tudor escaped from Raglan Castle, back to Pembroke Castle, when he was 14 years old.

Carew Castle

At the end of the eleventh century the Normans extended their conquest of England into Wales and Pembroke Castle became the centre of Norman rule in South Pembrokeshire. Gerald de Windsor was constable of the castle on behalf of Henry I when he decided to build his own fortification on the Carew River, some ten miles up the tidal waterway from Pembroke.

In the late fifteenth century the castle was greatly improved and extended by a very colourful character, Sir Rhys ap Thomas (1449-1525). He altered both the east and west ranges, and was responsible for many of the Bath stone windows and other features. Gaining the implicit trust of both Henry VII and Henry VIII he was said 'to rule this corner of Wales like a King'.

The final development took Carew from medieval fortress to Elizabethan manor. Sir John Perrot (1530-1592) built the great northern range, with its huge windows overlooking the Millpond. He was not destined to enjoy his magnificent new home, for he died in the Tower of London before the work could be completed.

In 1983 the National Park Authority leased the castle and surrounding area for 99 years. An extensive programme of restoration and management with the aims of conserving the buildings, improving their setting and increasing public access and enjoyment was started.

Llancaiach Fawr Manor

Llancaiach Fawr Manor was built in 1550 but we have set it in 1645. Visitors to the manor are greeted by servants who are dressed in the costume of the period and speak the old fashioned English as they talk about their lives and the lives of the master and mistress.

Colonel Edward Prichard the owner of Llancaiach Fawr Manor was a very important man, when war broke out between King Charles I and Parliament he was appointed Commissioner of Array to the King and tasked with raising men and money for the Royalist cause in Glamorganshire.

On the 5th August 1645 King Charles I came on a rallying tour through South Wales and visited Llancaiach Fawr. Unimpressed by the King’s entreaties, Colonel Prichard and many other Glamorgan gentry changed sides to support Parliament.

Llancaiach Fawr Manor can easily accommodate parties of up to 90 children at any one time and offers a range of formal education and learning opportunities at all Key Stages.

Bishop’s Palace

The Bishop’s Palace, situated next door to St David’s Cathedral, evokes a period when religion was the order of the day and bishops were powerbrokers par excellence. Lavish decorations, corbels carved as human heads and striking chequerboard stonework are all testament to the wealth and status of these medieval men of religion.

It was Bishop Henry de Gower (1328 - 1347) who was responsible for virtually the entire palace we see today. His legacy consists of two great ranges. The east range - the simpler of the two - was the first to be built. This was his private domain. The second, the south range, was much grander and built for stylish entertaining. The great hall, the most impressive chamber in the palace, created the perfect backdrop for banquets to entertain important guests and wealthy pilgrims.

Tin Shed

The Tin Shed Experience is a quaint and quirky 1940’s museum. It was set up by two friends five years ago, in a garage with a tin roof, at the centre of the picturesque village of Laugharne. The museum houses a fascinating collection of wartime costumes and memorabilia; a WWll Anderson shelter, and a 1940’s fully furnished cottage. The venue often stages musical evenings, and has a purpose built stage area for such events.

The aim of the Tin Shed Experience is not to glamorise war, but to help give an insight into what war meant to the life of ordinary civilians and those serving during the war years. The team are keen to educate the younger generation and hope to highlight the effects of war on everyday life in wartime Britain.

St Dogan Church, llanrhaeadr ym Mochnant

Even though William Morgan served in many parts of Wales, we mainly associate him with the Church at Llanrhaeadr ym Mochnant, as he stayed there from 1578 - 1595. There, as the parish vicar, over a period of ten years, William Morgan translated the Bible to Welsh. Cyhoeddwyd y Beibl Cymraeg cyntaf yn 1588.

Place

Blurb

Harlech Castle

Set amid the stunning scenery of the mountains and coast of Snowdonia, Harlech Castle is one of four 13th century fortifications that form a World Heritage site. It was built in 1283-89 after the conquest of Wales by Edward I, King of England, as a garrison to accompany the more palatial Caernarfon and Conwy Castles, constructed at the same time.

However, Harlech was taken for the Welsh by Owain Glyndwr in 1404 and became his home and court for the peak period of his 10 year rebellion against the English Crown. He held two parliaments, one at Machynlleth and one at Harlech and it is the Harlech one which is believed to be where he was officially declared Prince of Wales in a ceremony attended by envoys from France, Spain and Scotland. He fled Harlech, leaving his wife, daughter and grandchildren, in 1409 when Prince Henry, later to be Henry V, succeeded in his siege of the castle.

National Wool Museum

Wool was historically the most important and widespread of Wales’s industries. The picturesque village of Dre-fach Felindre in the beautiful Teffi valley, at the turn of the 19th century was the centre of a thriving woollen industry, earning the nickname ‘The Huddersfield of Wales’. The two World Wars made huge fortunes for the mills as fabric was needed to clothe millions of soldiers. However, after the Second World War, the price of wool plummeted and the mills began to close down.

The National Wool Museum is located in the historic former Cambrian Mills. Shirts and shawls, blankets and bedcovers, woollen stockings and socks were all made here, and sold in the surrounding countryside - and to the rest of the world.

The Museum displays tell the story of the Woollen Industry through working machinery, archive material, and exciting hands-on displays and textile gallery.

Newton House

Newton House

Lord Rhys ruled the Deheubarth from 1155, from his main family home at Dinefwr Castle.

In 1298, a ‘New Towne’ was developed on land given to those men loyal to Edward 1. The King was concerned about unrest in this part of Wales and so he hoped that by forming this ‘New Towne’, along with granting the people new trading rights, it would prosper and quell the unrest.

The current Newton House was built on this site in 1660 after many years of Dinefwr land being lost and won by the Rice (Dynevor) family due to various allegiances with Royalty. It was home to the Lords of Dynevor until the 1970s.

The National Library of Wales

The National Library of Wales

The National Library of Wales is the biggest library in Wales and serves as the nation's memory. As a legal deposit library it has the right to receive a free copy of everything published in Britiain and Ireland. Around 4,000 new publications are collected every week that add to The National Library's collection of:

  • - 6 million books and newspapers
  • - 950,000 photographs
  • - 60,000 works of art
  • - 1.5 million maps
  • - 7 million feet of film
  • - 40,000 manuscripts
  • - 250,000 hours of video
  • - 1,900 cubic metres of archives

Tŷ Mawr Wybrnant

Tŷ Mawr Wybrnant

William Morgan was born in 1545 at Tŷ Mawr, Wybrnant. He was one of five children and his parents were tenants on the estate of the powerful Wynn family of Gwydir, near Llanrwst. The road running by Wybrnant was a main drovers road in William Morgan’s time, and the family would often welcome the drovers and poets to their humble home.

It was a family tradition of the Wynn’s to take the ablest children of their tenants to be educated at Gwydir by the family tutor. As well a being educated by the travelling bards and mintrels who called at Tŷ Mawr, William Morgan was tutored at Gwydir, before heading to St John’s College Cambridge at the age of twenty.

Throughout his career, William Morgan served many parishes throughout Wales, but he is mainly associated with the vicarage of Llanrhaeadr - yn - Mochnant, because he stayed there from 1578 to 1595, and it was there that he translated the Bible into Welsh.

The first Welsh language Bible was published in 1588.

Mary Jones World

Mary Jones World

Mary Jones World is a new state of the art visitor and education centre that tells the story of Mary Jones and Thomas Charles, and the impact of the world’s bestselling book on Wales and the world.

In 1800, a 15 year-old girl called Mary Jones walked 26 miles from Llanfihangel-y-Pennant to Bala to buy a Bible. William Morgan’s Bible was the version Mary Jones wanted which led to the foundation of the Bible Society in 1804.

William Morgan’s story is also told at Mary Jones World as part of the history of Welsh Bibles.

St Fagans National History Museum

St Fagans

The St Fagans redevelopment project reached an exciting milestone this summer with the opening of it’s visitor entrance building and learning spaces. The performance will take place in the brand new purpose built lecture theatre in the Weston Centre for Learning.